Tag Archives: credit

7 Steps of Financial Spring Cleaning

7 steps of financial spring cleaning

Financial Spring Cleaning – Step 4

financial clean up step 4 with explanation

What to do With Your Tax Refund

income tax return form

Instead of just spending the money, you could plan to pay yourself.

Provided by Reeve Conover – Conover Consulting

About 70% of taxpayers receive sizable refunds from the Internal Revenue Service. Just how sizable? The average refund totals about $2,800.1

What do households do with that money? It varies. Last year, consumer financial services company Bankrate asked Americans about their plans for their federal tax refunds. Thirty-one percent of the respondents to Bankrate’s survey said that they would save or invest those dollars, and 28% indicated they would attack their debts with the money. Another 27% said they would buy food with that cash or use it to pay utility bills. Just 6% said they would earmark their refunds for shopping sprees or vacations.2

So, according to those survey results, about six in ten people who get a refund will use it to try and improve their personal finances. You could follow their example.

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End-of-the-Year Money Moves

the money game

Here are some things you might want to do before saying goodbye to 2016. 

What has changed for you in 2016? Did you start a new job or leave a job behind? Did you retire? Did you start a family? If notable changes occurred in your personal or professional life, then you will want to review your finances before this year ends and 2017 begins.

Even if your 2016 has been relatively uneventful, the end of the year is still a good time to get cracking and see where you can plan to save some taxes and/or build a little more wealth. 

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Retirees Are Racking Up Credit Card Debt

credit card debt

New statistics point out an alarming financial problem.

$6,876. That is the average amount of credit card debt owed by an American household headed up by an individual aged 65-69.1

If you are newly retired or close to retiring, that figure may alarm you. It is more than twice the amount of Social Security’s maximum monthly income payment.2

Credit card use is surging, and seniors are taking on more revolving debt as part of the trend. That $6,876 figure comes from personal finance website ValuePenguin, which just published its latest yearly study on U.S. credit card debt. As ValuePenguin found, revolving debt shrinks little with age: in households headed up by those 75 and older, the mean credit card balance was $5,638.1    

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